Furniture Paint - Problems applying subsequent coats

Painting & Decorating Chat
Post Reply
hardya
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2017 5:50 pm

Furniture Paint - Problems applying subsequent coats

Post by hardya » Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:58 pm

We are painting a pretty large wooden fire surround with chalky finish furniture paint.

The first coat went on very nicely and smoothly also seemed to key well, looked good, but was clear that further coat(s) needed.

Not sure of the right vocabulary, the second coat was kind of stiff going on in places and kind of bobbled here and there, also due to shape of the furniture difficult to paint in one direction quickly and so joining quickly drying paint with current painting as you come around leaves things lumpy and again a bit bobbly.

Always leaving day(s) between coats.

Before the third coat, light sanding on existing bobbly bits but aside from this still bobbly going on. Tried a little water as suggested by some with odd bits here and there to try to smooth out the bobbly bits, but then it bubbles.

In summary, first coat great, subsequent coats going on poor looking. Does paint get too old quickly? Fresh tin help? Any suggestions or solutions. It's really annoying.

Thanks,

Andrew.

User avatar
Colin
Site Admin
Posts: 2367
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 12:37 pm
Location: Cornwall/Devon Border

Re: Furniture Paint - Problems applying subsequent coats

Post by Colin » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:32 pm

I presume you're painting Annie Sloan chalk paint?
Hard to say what the problem is, could be painting too slow, too thinly? You can dip your brush into a jar of water and go over it again to smooth out any irregularities. If you are still having problems, give Annie Sloane a ring and they'll suggest some answers

hardya
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2017 5:50 pm

Re: Furniture Paint - Problems applying subsequent coats

Post by hardya » Mon Nov 20, 2017 10:20 pm

Thanks Colin.

It's actually "Rust-Oleum" not Annie Sloane, but maybe contacting them would help.

We did try the thing with water, but seemed to get bubbling.

Maybe we could try thicker and quicker as you suggest.

We have been painting out of the tin, rather than pouring some out. Not for hours though. Do you know whether the paint starts to change constituency maybe if you do that two or three times as the paint goes down? Replacing tin after each session of course. That's the only other thing that comes to mind.

Post Reply