Favourite brush for oil?

Tools of the trade and discussion thereof
Flash Point
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Re: Favourite brush for oil?

Post by Flash Point » Fri Feb 03, 2012 3:12 pm

Bristol Decorator wrote:
Flash Point wrote:
mikethebrush wrote:
My advice is to never put a natural bristle brush straight into water or a water-borne paint. Bristles are tubular and even though the manufacturer may set the bristles in a resin at the stock end water is still likely to be drawn up these capillaries, this will cause your brush to lose its springiness. I recommend that you always baptise your bristle brushes in an oil-based paint in order to seal off the ends and so stop this natural action.
I was once told to soak brushes in linseed oil to keep them soft, Ive never tried it but would make sense :good.gif:

I think you may be thinking of varnish brushes which were to be used again the following day. We used to suspend them up to the stock in a mixture of linseed oil and turps substitute. They were always cleaned and washed out thoroughly upon completion.

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brother of the brush
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Re: Favourite brush for oil?

Post by brother of the brush » Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:29 pm

Hi Guys and Girlie types

Flash Point
I also remember those days with the oil and sub turps

Well this has defo been one of the most popular threads.
" Painters weapons of choice "

We live in a throw away world it seems and our main " tool of application " suffers the same fate.
Hamiltons brushes are not what they used to be. Mind you neither are " wagon wheels "
I have found that for oil based materials the Fat Hog Moura seems to keep a decent shape and produce a pretty good finish, for the cost.
It is a blend, therefore not a malt - sorry had to - of natural and synthetic and quite honestly I think it is OK
Obviously Purdy are the boys for water based. However I do want to try out Wooster brushes. I will be contacted Pink Grip to order some.

Hope you are all picking up some work
I am in Glasgow and finding it very competitive. The big companies that would normally be doing new build are moving into my sector ( maintenance and refurb ) :mellow:

Best wishes to you all, may the force be with you
Stevie
What do we want ?
Time Travel
When do we want it ?
It is irrelevant

Niboryelnib
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Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2012 6:29 pm

Re: Favourite brush for oil?

Post by Niboryelnib » Tue Feb 07, 2012 7:43 pm

So here we go natural hogs hair or synthetic may sound boring but when I started in 1970 hey there was no choice all were hog hair bristle and to reply to the don't put natural bristle in water oh dear I musthave ruined lots of black bristle 7" distemper brushes cos that's all you use them in ok know the copper ferrul argument but again all the decorators I knew stored their oil brushes in pots of water pre vapour box days and used at will. We only used brushes for everything no rollers at all in fact most of our work rollers where banned this included painting texture to quote the old timers who drummed me into shape rollers where for subbies they hated subbies with a vengeance do not mention a roller pole. Ingrained into me still today for good plastered Walls will always brush with a natural hogs hair distemper brush hate the texture of rollers an insult to a good plasterer to add orange peel.

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Colin
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Re: Favourite brush for oil?

Post by Colin » Tue Feb 07, 2012 8:13 pm

Hear hear. Small bedrooms, bathrooms etc I always brush if poss. Only crack open a roller for ceilings or large rooms where the home-owner might think I was taking the pee if I didn't.

andyrolls
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Re: Favourite brush for oil?

Post by andyrolls » Tue Feb 07, 2012 9:02 pm

Jesus!

mikethebrush
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Re: Favourite brush for oil?

Post by mikethebrush » Tue Feb 07, 2012 9:15 pm

I too was taught on the brush, not allowed to use rollers and like colin i will break out the flat on small ceilings

I also used to keep my oil brushes in a kettle of water

your flats were used exclusively in waterbased , you wouldnt dream of sticking them in oil eggie or trying to cut in oil with them

oil brushes kept in water , the oil paint kept the water out of the bristle

with natural bristle once used in water they becoome flabby if you put them back int oil, I know as I have done it against the advice of my guvnorwho was as usual right
The consequenses of overcharging are far less serious than the consequences of undercharging and you are more likely to get the job

LJW61
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Re: Favourite brush for oil?

Post by LJW61 » Tue Feb 07, 2012 9:56 pm

Heck, Ive never owned a vapour box, my brushes are all stuffed into a pot of water, 10 in there at the moment, some been in water for 5 years & theyre in perfect condition,once oiled always waterproof...

Flash Point
Posts: 280
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Re: Favourite brush for oil?

Post by Flash Point » Tue Feb 07, 2012 10:11 pm

Niboryelnib wrote:So here we go natural hogs hair or synthetic may sound boring but when I started in 1970 hey there was no choice all were hog hair bristle and to reply to the don't put natural bristle in water oh dear I musthave ruined lots of black bristle 7" distemper brushes cos that's all you use them in ok know the copper ferrul argument but again all the decorators I knew stored their oil brushes in pots of water pre vapour box days and used at will. We only used brushes for everything no rollers at all in fact most of our work rollers where banned this included painting texture to quote the old timers who drummed me into shape rollers where for subbies they hated subbies with a vengeance do not mention a roller pole. Ingrained into me still today for good plastered Walls will always brush with a natural hogs hair distemper brush hate the texture of rollers an insult to a good plasterer to add orange peel.
1. No synthetic brushes in 1970? I had used a nylon filament 2" brush in the mid 60s given to me to try by a rep, it was impossible to manipulate oil-based paint and achieve a satisfactory finish. None of us thought of trying it out in the water-borne primer/undercoat that we were using. I can't remember the manufactuer of the paint but it was alright on trim.

2. Your distemper brush was never going to require the springiness required of the filament of a brush used in an oil-based paint. Most distemper brushes are aldulterated with a vegetable fibre such as tampico and/or horsehair for two reasons 1. to keep the cost down and 2. bristle longer than 4" has been very hard to come by for a very long time.

3. Regarding rollers I suppose it depends on how forward thinking your firm was at the time. I started my own firm in 1969 and I was using rollers and roller equipment from Stephenson Brothers from this time on, excellent rollers and excellent equipment. I had also been spraying since 1966 (a special year for England) on jobs where large ceiling and wall areas were to be painted be it: gloss, eggshell, flat oil or emulsion.

Niboryelnib
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Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2012 6:29 pm

Re: Favourite brush for oil?

Post by Niboryelnib » Wed Feb 08, 2012 8:04 pm

I agree nylon brushes were available in the seventies but were rubbish no one could developed the natural flag of pure bristle as for distemper brushes being a mixture no way hamiltons produced pure black and lily hogs hair brushes I know still got them all be only now 1.5" long worn from use as paste brushes no added cheap crap at all yes they were expensive but looked after and cherished like an old friend good brushes produced good work cheap mixture brushes with ply handles good for soaking paper off and scrubbing down only. Find on high end work customers appreciate the skill of a man with a brush they can use a roller but brushing a large ceiling with a distemper brush of a plank scaffold that's what they pay for level of expertise. Got to say though if work already spooky with roller finish or painting texture got to go with modern technology and roller away.

mikethebrush
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Re: Favourite brush for oil?

Post by mikethebrush » Thu Feb 09, 2012 12:14 pm

Im reading both sides of this arument and your arguing the same points without listening to each other which is silly as we are all on the same page

I know flashpoint is right for 2 reasons firstly what i was taught and ignored to my detriment, I ended up with all emo brushes and nothing that would work in oils, bearing in mind you coould only buy pure bristle, a very annoyed guv bought me new brushes on the understanding they stayed in oil, but thta didnt mean they didnt live in a kettle of water, they did but the oil kept the water out of the bristle. years later I read in a hamiltons catalogue why you cant use their brushes in water and then use them in oils, flashpoint has given the reasons so I wont repeat them

so to make it clear, you can use pure bristle in water , which everyone agrees softens them up, to no detriment to the brush providing they stay in water

you can also store your oil brushes in water as the oil in the bristle keeps the water out so its no detriment to your brush and yu can continue using them in oil

what you shouldnt be doing is starting brushes off in mully and then switching them to oil

hamiltons themselves advise against it and if anyone should know they should

my question was , and it still hasent been answered and I do want to know as Ive heard it several times lately

why do you want to soften your brushes and take the spring out of them before using them in oils
The consequenses of overcharging are far less serious than the consequences of undercharging and you are more likely to get the job

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